“We turned o’er many books together”

The Merchant of Venice  IV, 1, 155

Abbott, E. A. A Shakespearian Grammar. New York: Dover Publications, 1966.

The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 3rd Edition. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1992.

Allen, W. Sidney. Vax Latina. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1965.

Attridge, Derek. Poetic Rhythm: An Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

Barton, John. Playing ShakespeareLondon and New York: Methuen, 1984.

Berry, Cicely. The Actor and the Text. New York: Applause, 1992.

Text in ActionLondon: Virgin Publishing, 2001.

Cercignani, Fausto. Shakespeare’s Words and Elizabethan PronunciationOxford: Clarendon Press, 1981.

Colaianni, Louis. Shakespeare’s Names: A New Pronouncing DictionaryNew York: Quite Specific Media Group, 1999.

Coye, Dale F. Pronouncing Shakespeare’s WordsWestport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1998.

Crystal, David and Crystal, Ben. Shakespeare’s Words. Penguin Press, 2002.

Dobson, E. J. English Pronunciation, 1500-1700. 2 vols. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1968.

Ehrlich, Eugene. Amo, Amas, Amat and More: How to Use Latin to Your Own Advantage and to the Astonishment of OthersNew York: Harper & Row, 1985.

Irvine, Theodora Ursula. How to Pronounce the Names in ShakespeareAnn Arbor, Michigan: Gryphon Books, 1971.

Jones, Daniel. English Pronouncing Dictionary15th Edition. Edited by Peter Roach and James Hartmann. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997.

Everyman’s English Pronouncing Dictionary. Extensively revised and edited by A.C. Gimson. London and Melbourne:  J.M. Dent & Sons, 1986.

Kermode, Frank. Shakespeare’s Language. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2001.

Kokeritz, Helge. Shakespeare’s Names: A Pronouncing DictionaryNew Haven: Yale University Press, 1959.

Shakespeare’s PronunciationNew Haven: Yale University Press, 1953.

McDonald,  Russ. The Bedford Companion to ShakespeareBoston and New York: Bedford Books of St. Martin’s Press, 1996.

McLean, Margaret Prendergast. Good American Speech. New York: E.P. Dutton and Co., 1946.

Merriam- Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 10th Edition. Springfield, Mass.: Merriam-Webster, 1993.

Morwood, James. A Dictionary of Latin Words and Phrases. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

The Oxford English Dictionary2nd Edition. 20 vols. Oxford: Clarendon, 1989.

The Oxford Universal Dictionary, 3rd Edition. Oxford: Clarendon, 1944.

A Pronouncing Dictionary of American EnglishEditors John Samuel Kenyon and Thomas Albert Knott. Springfield, Mass.: G&C Merriam Co., 1953.

The Reader’s Encyclopedia of Shakespeare. Editors Oscar James Campbell and Edward G. Quinn. New York: MJF Books, 1966.

Reading Shakespeare’s Dramatic Language – A Guide. Editors  Sylvia Adamson, Lynette Hunter, Lynne Magnusson, Ann Thompson, and Katie Wales. London: Thomson Learning, 2001.

Schmidt, Alexander. Shakespeare Lexicon and Quotation Dictionary2 Vols. New York: Dover Publications, 1971.

Shakespeare, William. The First Folio of Shakespeare 1623. Prepared and Introduced by Doug Maston. New York: Applause Books,  1995.

Shakespeare, William. William  Shakespeare: The Complete WorksGeneral Editor, Alfred Harbage. New York: The Viking Press, 1969.

Skinner, Edith. Speak With Distinction. Edited by Lilene Mansell. Revised by Timothy Monich and Lilene Mansell. New York: Applause, 1990.

Spain, Delbert. Shakespeare Sounded SoundlySanta Barbara, California: Garland-Clarke Editions/Capra Press, 1988.

Tarlinskaja, Marina. Shakespeare’s Verse. New York: Peter Lang, 1987.

Webster’s Third New International Dictionary of the English LanguageSpringfield, Mass.: Merriam, 1961.

Wilkinson, L. P. Golden Latin Artistry. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1963.

Wright, George T. Shakespeare’s Metrical ArtBerkeley, California: University of California  Press, 1988.

Other editions of Shakespeare consulted include The Riverside Shakespeare and The Oxford Shakespeare, as well as individual volumes in the following series: The Arden, Folger, Kittredge, New American Library, The New Cambridge, New Clarendon, New Penguin, and New Swan.